Posts Tagged farmer

Mark Kastel on Facebook Live: Thank YOUR Farmer This Thanksgiving

Wednesday, November 21st, 2018

Thank a Farmer

Thank an organic farmer today! https://www.cornucopia.org/donate

Posted by The Cornucopia Institute on Wednesday, November 21, 2018

To unmute, click on the sound icon in the lower right corner of the video.

Truly organic farmers cultivate human and environmental health as well as excellent food. Cornucopia urges everyone to buy organic and thank their farmers over the holidays and throughout the year. Many organic family farmers are in crisis, barely able to keep food on their own tables, and need your patronage.

Cornucopia Executive Director Mark Kastel shares his commitment to supporting these stewards of the soil and credits organic farmers with helping him recover his personal health.

If you identify a farmer you’d like to honor when you donate to Cornucopia this giving season, we will send a card and special thanks on your behalf.

As U.S. Immigration Policies Tighten, Farmers Turn to Cumbersome Federal Program for Labor

Wednesday, November 21st, 2018

Cornucopia’s Take: Immigration policies have made farm laborers hard to find. U.S. citizens are largely unwilling to perform the demanding work required to grow and harvest the food we eat, so farmers have turned to the H-2A visa program for help. The paperwork and requirements of the program are increasingly daunting, and farmers are often unable to get enough help to bring in huge crops at one time. Interestingly, this labor shortage is causing some farmers to diversify their crops in order to spread their labor needs across the growing season, resulting in a smaller workforce that is employed longer.


Farmers Are Seeking More Temporary H-2A Workers, And Keeping Them Longer
Harvest Public Media
by Esther Honig

Source: USDA, Flickr

The high-desert town of Palisade, Colorado, is synonymous with fresh, locally grown peaches. Years ago, thousands of migrant workers would flock here each year in August to harvest the fuzzy fruit. But today, on its narrow dirt roads, Bruce Talbott drives a truck loaded down with 9 tons of wine grapes.

For more than 100 years and five generations, Talbott’s family has grown mostly peaches. But he’s diversified, he said, because in the early 2000s, that pool of labor began drying up. Now, he grows peaches, grapes, cherries and pears, all of which ripen at different points in the season.

“There’s not a labor pool that would allow us to pick that volume of fruit all at once,” he said.

Across the country, farmers have voiced concerns over what they say is a growing labor shortage. While there are about 2.7 million agricultural workers in the U.S. — about half undocumented immigrants — farmers say finding reliable local workers has become increasingly difficult, especially for hand-picked fruit and vegetable crops.

Listen to the story by Harvest Public Media’s Esther Honig here

That’s why an increasing number are turning to the federal H-2A visa program, which allows farmers to bring in workers temporarily from foreign countries. In the 2018 fiscal year, more than 240,000 H-2A visas were granted: a record and a 21 percent increase from about a year ago.

The program isn’t cheap: Employers are required to provide housing, travel and pay the adverse effect wage, an hourly rate that’s slightly higher than the regional minimum wage. Estimates range from $1,000 to $2,000 a worker, so that’s why farmers like Talbott have learned to bring workers in earlier in the season and keep them until late fall. Read Full Article »

Join Cornucopia Live Wednesday at 11:45 AM CT to Find Out How to Thank YOUR Farmer This Thanksgiving

Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

Do you know where your food comes from? Are you dedicated to buying local and organic from authentic family farms? Are you thankful for the farmers that get up early and stay up late in the heat of the summer and cold of the winter to produce nutritious food grown with love and respect for Earth’s natural systems?

We know you are – so let us help you thank them!

Each year at this time, Cornucopia pledges that for every donation made on behalf of a farmer, we will send them a hand-written acknowledgement card to show our gratitude.

Tune in live on Facebook tomorrow, Wednesday, November 21 at 11:45 AM Central, to join Cornucopia Executive Director and Senior Farm Policy Analyst Mark Kastel as he shares his appreciation for the hard-working, dedicated family farmers who make it possible for all of us to eat well and find nourishment throughout the year and to hear how Cornucopia can help you recognize your own local, organic farmer this Thanksgiving season.

Read Full Article »

We Owe These Farmers …

Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

Dear Cornucopia members and supporters,

Pat Slattery of Middle Ridge, Wisconsin is the self-professed Brussels Sprout King of the Midwest. Pat has long been dedicated to high-quality wholesale and retail organics, as the photo indicates, and supportive of the community of farmers. We have been friends for over two decades—thank you to the Slattery family for your important work!

Thanksgiving is a time to especially acknowledge our connection to the earth and the cornucopia of wonderful food it provides. It’s also a time to remember the efforts of the farmers, ranchers, and fisher families who make Thanksgiving feasts across the country possible.

I hope you’ll join me in remembering their crucial, life-sustaining work during this festive season. In 2018 many conventional and organic farmers are economically hurting.

If you don’t have a farmer in the family, or in the neighborhood, you can thank a farmer directly at the farmers market, or through your CSA, or at your local co-op. Supporting our country’s best farmers with your patronage is the ultimate pat on the back!

If you feel like doing more in this season of giving, you can dedicate a Cornucopia donation to a farmer. When you make a donation online, you can select “gift in honor of” and then fill in the name of your favorite farmer, and we will send them a hand-written acknowledgement card.

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