Completed Action Alerts Archive

Keep Fragile Ecosystems Wild

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

[The comment period for this issue is now closed.]

[Read Cornucopia’s comprehensive comments on this issue.]

Comment to the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) by March 30

Though organic agriculture promotes and enhances biodiversity, organic regulations do not explicitly protect sensitive native ecosystems from being converted into organic production – in fact, they incentivize it!

Image source: Airwolfhound

The National Organic Program’s (NOP) three-year waiting period for land to be free of prohibited substances unintentionally incentivizes producers to convert native ecosystems, since this land is instantly ready for organic production.

By eliminating the incentive to convert native ecosystems with a rule change, producers will be encouraged to transition the right land: the 99% of U.S. agricultural land that is still conventionally managed.

Over the last two years, the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) has received public comments describing loss of high value conservation and fragile ecosystem acreage when farmers transition to organic production. The NOSB has been asked to review this issue and propose some incentives and disincentives to reduce conversion of high value conservation ecosystems.

Tell the NOSB to eliminate the incentive to convert native ecosystems to organic production.

Post your comments online today — deadline March 30 Read Full Article »

Keep Organics Rooted in Nutritious Soil

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

[The comment period for this issue is now closed.]

Comment to the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) by March 30

When food grown without soil (hydroponic) is allowed to carry the organic label, the environmental and health benefits that underpin organic farming are lost, and legitimate, soil-based farmers who steward the land are unfairly undercut by this cheaper/industrialized growing method.

You can do something about this …
      … to protect real organic farmers and nutritionally superior food!

Hydroponic Pepper Operation
(c) Dario Sabljak/Adobe Stock

In 2010 the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) voted to prohibit hydroponics in organics.  Seven years later, the USDA has still not acted on this recommendation, turning a blind eye to the illegal organic certification of industrial-scale soil-less growers (both domestic and major importers).

Meanwhile, opposition to industrial organic hydroponic and “container” operations is growing. Organic farmers have organized and rallied to “keep the soil in organic.” Consumers are demanding nutrient dense food grown in soils high in organic matter.

Senator Patrick Leahy, Senator Bernie Sanders, and Congressman Peter Welch, have called for a moratorium on new hydroponic organic certification.  A letter signed by 45 organizations representing over two million members also called for a moratorium. The National Organic Program still has not responded.

Please join the resistance by telling the USDA to keep the soil in organics!

Post your comments online today — deadline March 30 Read Full Article »

Take Action: Sign the Petition — It’s Time to Remove Carrageenan (Intestinal Inflammatory Agent/Carcinogen) from Organics!

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

[This alert is over – and we won! The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) voted in November 2016 to remove carrageenan from the National List for use in organics. It will be some time before all organic products are carrageenan free. Until then consult Cornucopia’s buying guide.]

The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) will be voting in just a few weeks on whether or not to continue to allow carrageenan in organic food at their semi-annual meeting in St. Louis, Missouri, November 16-18.

You can make a positive impact today by signing the petition to remove carrageenan from organic food!

The Cornucopia Institute will hand deliver your petition to the NOSB at the meeting to support the vote to remove carrageenan from certified organic foods. Organics should be the go-to refuge when seeking truly safe food for your family. After the NOSB meeting, we will also deliver the petition to the FDA to call for removing carrageenan from all food. Read Full Article »

USDA Weighing Approval for Non-browning GMO Apple

Friday, September 9th, 2016

[This action alert is over.]

Public Can Comment Until Midnight Monday, September 12

Source: Jerald Jackson

The USDA is nearing approval of a third genetically engineered apple from Okanagan Specialty Fruits.  The company’s Fuji GMO apple is designed not to brown when sliced or exposed to air.  Any apple eater knows that an apple’s freshness and peak nutrition is reflected by the lack of browning.

Okanagan’s non-browning apple, however, is a marketer’s dream, allowing them to deceptively sell what appears to be fresh, high quality fruit.  The company describes their GMO apple as a “cost-saving means for the fresh sliced apple business.”  The reality is that the GMO apple is a bit like a Twinkie (which can seemingly appear fresh for decades), as consumers will have no idea how fresh the company’s Arctic brand apples actually are.

The USDA is accepting public comments on the proposal until midnight Monday (EST), September 12, on the Fuji GMO apple. Read Full Article »

Danone’s Acquisition of WhiteWave Foods Could Harm Ethical Dairy Farmers and Consumers

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

[This alert is over, and we won!] 

Don’t Let Giant Corporations and Factory Farms Corrupt Organics!

CI_DanoneWWMergerFrench dairy giant Groupe Danone (Dannon in the U.S.) has announced the proposed acquisition of WhiteWave Foods for approximately $10 billion. The deal would combine the Danone-owned and world’s largest organic yogurt brand Stonyfield with Wallaby, a rapidly growing yogurt label. The deal would also give Danone control over the Horizon organic brands, which is the nation’s largest brand of organic milk.

The U.S. government should protect market competition by enforcing laws, including the Sherman Act and Clayton Act, which decry anti-competitive practices including price fixing, monopolization, and controlling trusts. Both the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice are charged with reviewing acquisitions over a certain size for anti-competitive concerns.

All organic stakeholders should be concerned by the Danone-WhiteWave acquisition. The market for organic dairy already has less competition than other agricultural sectors and is more susceptible to monopolization and price fixing. Read Full Article »