Media/News Archive

10 Best: Places to Dine Down on the Farm

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

USA Today
by Larry Bleiberg

Source: Ralph Daily

With farm-to-table restaurants booming in popularity, farms themselves are now getting in on the act, offering meals to diners craving super-fresh cuisine that’s often raised on site. “The producers are honoring the ground, presenting the fruits of their labor in a fun and delicious fashion,” says Matt Jones of Slow Food USA, an organization dedicated to sustainable, local agriculture. He shares some favorites with Larry Bleiberg for USA TODAY. Many of these meals are offered seasonally and often support food-based charities. Read Full Article »

New Report Finds Ocean-based Fish Farming at Odds with Organic Standard

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Center for Food Safety

Source: Joseph Azzopardi

October 21, 2014 (Washington, DC)Today, Center for Food Safety (CFS) released a comprehensive, scientific report detailing why ocean-based aquaculture (fish farming) can never be certified organic.  In advance of USDA’s publication of regulations to govern organic aquaculture, CFS’s report, Like Water and Oil:  Ocean-Based Fish Farming and Organic Don’t Mix, warns that permitting “organic” aquaculture at sea would put the entire U.S. organic industry in jeopardy by weakening the integrity of the USDA organic label.  Fifty-three fishers, organic farmers, organic consumers, and animal welfare and environmental advocacy organizations endorsed the major findings of the Report in an Organic Aquaculture Position Statement.

“It’s mind-boggling to think that USDA would seriously consider allowing fish farms at sea to be organic,” said Dr. Lisa J. Bunin, Center for Food Safety’s Organic Policy Director and the report’s co-author.  “It’s absolutely impossible to control or monitor the wide range of substances, including toxic pollutants, that flow into and out of sea-based farms.” Read Full Article »

EPA Analysis Evidence Notorious Neonics Should be Suspended, Watchdog Groups Say

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Analysis ‘has confirmed what farmers, beekeepers and scientists have been saying all along: neonicotinoids do more harm than good’

Common Dreams
by Andrea Germanos

Source: Carol Von Canon

A new U.S Environmental Protection Agency analysis of neonicotinoid pesticides on soybean production offers further proof that they should be suspended, environmental watchdog groups say.

This class of pesticides, often referred to as neonics, has been linked to the decline of bees and other environmental harm.

The agency’s analysis, released Thursday, found that there was little to no benefit to using neonicotinoid seed treatments on soybean yields. Such neonic-treated seeds, first registered for use in soybeans in 2004, were applied on an average of 30% of soybean acres between 2008 and 2012, EPA states. The analysis notes that some growers report having difficulties in obtaining non-treated seed.

It also states that “much of the observed use is preventative and may not be currently providing any actual pest management benefits.” Read Full Article »

Tune In to Food Sleuth Radio

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

CI_SleuthRadio

Join Melinda Hemmelgarn, a registered dietitian and investigative nutritionist, for 28-minute, weekly interviews with national experts in food, health and agriculture. From physicians to film makers, writers, farmers, scientists and chefs, Food Sleuth Radio navigates our complicated food system. You’ll discover how farm and food policies impact our environment and public health, and learn the secrets to eating well. Provocative, practical and personal, Food Sleuth Radio helps us think beyond our plates to find “food truth.”  Award-winning Food Sleuth Radio ranks among the top national “green food radio shows.” If you care about what you eat, tune in. Read Full Article »

When It Comes to Food Packaging, What We Don’t Know Could Hurt Us

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Ensia
by Elizabeth Grossman

Credit: dvs

It’s almost impossible to imagine life without flexible, transparent and water-resistant food packaging, without plastic sandwich bags, cling film or shelves filled with plastic jars, tubs and tubes, and durable bags and boxes.

While storing food in containers dates back thousands of years, and food has been sold in bottles since the 1700s and cans since the 1800s, what might be considered the modern age of food packaging began in the 1890s when crackers were first sold in sealed waxed paper bags inside a paperboard box. Plastics and other synthetics began to appear in the 1920s and ’30s, shortly after chemical companies started experimenting with petroleum-based compounds and pioneering new materials that could be used for household as well as industrial applications.

Fast forward to 2014: Upwards of 6,000 different manufactured substances are now listed by various government agencies as approved for use in food contact materials in the U.S. and Europe — materials that can legally go into consumer food packaging, household and commercial food containers, food processing equipment, and other products. Read Full Article »