Media/News Archive

Introducing Carrot

Monday, October 20th, 2014

Introducing Carrot

Carrot is designed with you in mind. It’s a seamless experience, meticulously crafted, from beginning to end. It’s not just a vegetable, it’s what a vegetable should be.

Visit http://www.introducingcarrot.com/ for more information. Read Full Article »

Can E. Coli in Supermarket Meat Cause UTIs?

Friday, October 17th, 2014

Frontline
by Tim Molloy

Credit: Mattosaurus

Any urinary tract infection is bad, but some are getting worse. Along with the burning, piercing pain that typically accompanies a UTI, these infections pose another challenge: They’re getting much harder to treat.

For the past 20 years, doctors have been tracking a troubling rise in antibiotic-resistant UTIs, which primarily affect women. There are an estimated 8 million UTIs in the United States each year, and though most of these infections are still treatable with more powerful antibiotics, some otherwise healthy patients find themselves in need of IV treatment — and in some cases can develop deadly bloodstream infections.

“You don’t have a normally healthy 30-year-old woman come in, who’s never been in a hospital, with a resistant urinary tract infection that’s moved to her blood,” Elizabeth DuPreez, an infectious disease pharmacist who helped treat cases in Flagstaff, Ariz., explained FRONTLINE. “Where did she get that organism from?” Read Full Article »

Neonicotinoid Toxicity ‘Takes Your Breath Away’

Friday, October 17th, 2014

FarmingUK

beesthriveBees and other wildlife are being ‘quietly poisoned’ by chemicals which are 5000 times more toxic than DDT, according to Professor Dave Goulson of the University of Sussex.

The Social Association’s annual conference established the case for continuing the ban on neonicotinoids, with Professor Goulson discussing saying the toxicity ‘takes your breath away.’

Goulson noted that studies on neonicotinoids have overwhelmingly found negative effects on bumblebee colonies and behaviour – and the very same chemicals which are killing bees are still readily available in any garden centre.

More research into the impacts and wider effects of neonicotinoids is necessary to prevent further damage to our on waterways and soils. Equally, the time has come for policy makers to take note of the chilling evidence that face our pollinators and the wildlife that inhabits the British countryside.

The Soil Association is keen for all farmers to work together to look at different ways of managing pests. The public have an important role to play too in protecting our bees, birds and soils – steps could include reducing the amount of common sprays used on back gardens to kill insects and buying insecticide-free organic food. Read Full Article »

Gov. Brown Signs Bill Banning Commercial Production of Genetically Modified Salmon

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

The Press Democrat
by Derek Moore

Credit: Steven Pavlov

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a North Coast lawmaker’s bill banning the commercial production of genetically altered salmon.

AB 504, authored by Assemblyman Wes Chesbro, D-Arcata, extends the prohibition of spawning or cultivating so-called “transgenic salmonids” in the Pacific Ocean to all waters of the state. The hatchery production and stocking of such fish also is prohibited.

The legislation protects the state’s native steelhead trout and salmon populations, Chesbro said. He noted that federal food and drug regulators are reviewing an application by a company, AquaBounty Technologies, that seeks to raise genetically altered salmon in the United States. Read Full Article »

Dr. Huber’s Brave Crusade Against Biotech

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Prevention
by Robyn O’Brien

Credit: London Permaculture

Dr. Don Huber was hit by a car last night. He is a whistle blower in the food world and someone I have had the honor of knowing.

Dr. Huber is Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology at Purdue University, a land grant institution, and has been studying plants for 55 years. He has received various awards for his scientific accomplishments and contributions to government.

He was Cereal Pathologist at the University of Idaho for 8 years before joining the Department of Botany & Plant Pathology at Purdue University in 1971.

His agricultural research the past 50 years has focused on the epidemiology and control of soil borne plant pathogens with emphasis on microbial ecology, cultural and biological controls, and physiology of host parasite relationships.

He’s in his 80s, and he is also a father, a grandfather and has had a 41-year military career as a retired Colonel.

He is someone I have turned to in this work when I read,”Pesticides may be putting young children at risk of cancer.”  Other headlines have suggested that pesticides are linked to Parkinson’s, autism and other conditions. Read Full Article »